Reichenbach Multicolor – Where’s the excitement?

Quite a while back I bought 1/2 pound of Reichenbach Multicolor (RL-6209) and for whatever reason I never tried it – until today (thanks Pam for reminding and inspiring me). It’s a lovely glass, and I can’t believe that there is not much more excitement over this color on the usual glass forums.

It starts off as a muddy-green-brown colored rod, similar to Reichenbach Iris Orange (Raku) and Gaffer Chalcedony. Contrary to Raku and Chalcedony it’s COE 104, which is great for me, because that is the COE that I use most of the time. Yay!

It flows like butter, the rods are not shocky at all, and best of all: it’s super-easy to strike and develops colors reminiscent of Chalcedony and some of the rare Strikingcolor colors.

After initial heating the bead to a nice glowing red and cooling it down the glass turned a dark transparent amber. A short reheat and the first colors to develop were dark purple and dark cobalt. Another couple of turns in the flame, and the colors are changing from dark to light, with a full blue range from sky blue, turquoise, cobalt.
If you overstrike, and the colors turn too light or into poo-green … just reheat until nicely glowing, and start another striking cycle.

I started off with some disks and spheres. But once I moved to small spacers, I had more trouble to get the same vivid colors. This glass clearly likes marvering, hence the trouble with the little spacers. It did work better though once I blew onto the bead to cool it down faster.

So unless this glass is playing tricks with me and loses it’s colors in the kiln, I’m really excited about it. I’m just surprised that there’s not more hoopla about it. It’s much easier to strike than Raku and even easier than Chalcedony. It has a very similar color range as some of the Strikingcolor colors, but with $40 per pound it’s considerably cheaper. It’s COE104, which should appeal to many glass artists.

Maybe the problem is that there were so many nice striking colors released in the last couple of months, some of them hyped already months in advance, that Reichenbach Multicolor got overlooked by many. What do you think? Is it just me or did you also neglect this color so far?

I will be back tomorrow with photos of the beads, fresh out of the kiln.

Advertisements

5 comments

  1. Pam

    Oh, I can't wait to see how they came out! I will be SO happy if they keep their color and even more happy if this glass can be shaped in presses and keep it's color! I'm with you, glad it's 104coe. I don't know why there's no hoopla about it either, I only just learned about it a couple days ago and have only seen one set made with it. Looking forward to playing with it soon 🙂

  2. Pam, I used graphite to marver it and shaped the beads in a graphite beadroller.
    I shoud try if it works better with brass or graphite though.
    Let me know about your Multicolor experiences and how the beads are coming out. Will be good to see if others are just as excited about this glass as I am.

  3. Hi, I also fell in love with Multicolor and agree with everything you said about it! Likewise, my first approach to it was to make a lot of simple spacers to see what the colors would be. I'm really excited about it. The set of spacers sold fast, too!

  4. Hi Flonche. Yes, same experience here. I sold the set Multicolor set (see photos in my other blog post about this glass) for a really good price with additional custom orders following the auction.
    The glass is pretty popular not only with myself, but also with my customers. I will definitely offer more sets with it. I'm just now listing some Multicolor disks on the bay. Let's see how they go.

  5. Rita Bennett

    I am very new to bead making and have only a Hothead on a propane bottle,I was so pleased to read abought the Reichonback glass. I was so excited when the rods came but then when I made the beads in Iris Orange and Magic they came out just a muddy green instead of fibrant colours, I just did not know what I did wrong.
    Your work is so fantastic, I would love to produce anything nearly as beautiful.

    regards
    Rita
    U.K

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: